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News Updates

Supervised self-injection with empty syringes improved comfort in food-allergic adolescents administering epinephrine, study finds
Source:
Science Daily

A new intervention could save lives, recognizing that adolescents are at higher risk for fatal food-allergic reactions.

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Allergies? Probiotic combination may curb your symptoms, new study finds
Source:
University of Florida

As we head into allergy season, you may feel less likely to grab a hanky and sneeze. That’s because new University of Florida research shows a probiotic combination might help reduce hay fever symptoms, if it’s taken during allergy season.

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Shorter course of immunotherapy does not improve symptoms of allergic rhinitis long-term
Source:
Science Daily

Among patients with moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis, two years of immunotherapy tablets was not significantly different from placebo in improving nasal symptoms at 3-year follow-up, according to a study appearing in the February 14 issue of JAMA.

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Asthma and allergies: a protective factor in farm milk
Source:
Medical News Today

Fresh, unprocessed cow’s milk has a higher content of omega-3 fatty acids than does pasteurized, homogenized or low-fat milk. This factor partly explains why children who consume the unprocessed product are less likely to develop asthma.

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New study indicates why children are likelier to develop food allergies
Source:
Medical Xpress

An estimated 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, many of them children. These are non-trivial concerns, as food allergy or intolerance can cause symptoms ranging from a harmless skin rash to a potentially lethal anaphylactic shock. The good news is that many affected children outgrow their allergy, presumably as the immune system learns to tolerate food initially mistaken as “foreign”.

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Hay fever medicine reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome
Source:
Medical News Today

Researchers from KU Leuven, Belgium, have identified the cause of abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). As a result, they were able to select a medicine that could reduce or end that pain. This medicine is already used to treat hay fever.

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Researchers find link between self-reported penicillin allergy, urticaria
Source:
Healio

The prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with urticaria is three times higher than the general population, and the prevalence of urticaria in patients with a self-reported penicillin allergy is also three times higher than the general population, according to a recently published study.

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New review: What to do to prevent food allergies in infants
Source:
Medical Xpress

With food allergies in children on the rise, parents often ask the question, How do I prevent food allergies in my baby? A new review published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), based on the latest evidence, interprets new evidence to guide physicians and families regarding food introduction and allergy prevention.

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Biologics for asthma: Attacking the source of the disease, not the symptoms
Source:
Medical News Today

Imagine you suffer from severe asthma, and you’ve tried every treatment available, but nothing has worked. You still can’t breathe. Then a new therapy comes along that attacks the source of the asthma, as opposed to the symptoms, and treats the disease at a cellular level. That’s the promise of biologics, and the topic of four presentations at the 2015 ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in San Antonio, November 5-9.

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Substantial increase in costs for uncontrolled asthma
Source:
Medical Xpress

A considerable proportion of patients with mild to moderate asthma are symptomatically uncontrolled, and uncontrolled asthma is associated with significantly increased costs, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in Allergy.

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Video: Sublingual allergy treatment provides alternative to shots
Source:
Medical Xpress

For patients with severe seasonal allergies the regularly available medications may not be enough to help their symptoms while the prospect of shots may be prohibitive enough to keep them from getting shots. A newly approved treatment could provide an alternative to the needle.

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Hay fever sufferers prefer prescription medication, but use over-the-counter relief
Source:
Medical Xpress

Anyone suffering with seasonal allergies knows the local pharmacy carries shelves full of over-the-counter medications to help manage symptoms. Unfortunately, most seasonal allergy sufferers take over-the counter (OTC) products rather than the treatments they actually prefer – prescription medications.

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Food in skincare products linked to development of allergies
Source:
Medical Xpress

Firstly goat milk and now oats have been revealed as allergenic ingredients in skin care products in a latest study by Monash University allergy researchers.

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Allergy to Soy Reported After Percutaneous Sensitization
Source:
Health Day

Reduced skin barrier function seen in patients with atopic dermatitis may cause percutaneous sensitization by various proteins, such as food, according to a case report published in the September issue of The Journal of Dermatology.

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Novel tool can identify COPD
Source:
Science Daily

A novel approach for the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been developed by a team of researchers. COPD is underdiagnosed, and previous screening tools have relied on smoking history and patient report of cough and sputum. COPD is often uncovered during exacerbations and after significant loss of lung function.

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Immunological Cross-Reactions May Increase Food Allergies
Source:
Health Day

Food allergy can be caused by immunological cross-reactions to common inhalant allergens, with diverse patterns of allergic reactions to foods observed, according to a position paper published in the September issue of Allergy.

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Antibiotic overuse might be why so many people have allergies
Source:
Medical Xpress

Scientists have warned for decades that the overuse of antibiotics leads to the development of drug-resistant bacteria, making it harder to fight infectious disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that drug resistant bacteria cause 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses each year.

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Even if severe allergic reaction is in doubt, epinephrine should be used
Source:
Medical News Today

There are times when emergency physicians can’t be 100 percent sure a person is suffering from a severe allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis, and may hesitate to use epinephrine. A new article says when in doubt – administer the epinephrine.

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Wheeze, ED visits increase in patients with rhinovirus
Source:
Healio

Rhinovirus appeared associated with a significant number of hospitalizations and emergency department visits, according to study results.

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Got a rash? You might be allergic to nickel, dermatologist says
Source:
Medical Xpress

Nickel is one of the most common causes of a skin rash that occurs due to contact with an allergen, a dermatologist says.

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High pollen levels hitting allergy sufferers hard
Source:
Medical Xpress

This year’s harsh winter staved off an early arrival of springtime allergies, but the wet weather that has gardens looking lush and green also means tree pollen – especially oak – has made things worse than usual for those who suffer.

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Peanut allergies common among children with asthma, but families often do not know
Source:
Medical News Today

Up to 3% of children in the US, Western Europe and Australia are affected by peanut allergies, with evidence also emerging that this sensitivity is beginning to affect children in Asia and Africa. These allergies develop early in life and are rarely outgrown.

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Exposure to air pollution in the first year of life increases risk for allergies
Source:
Medical Xpress

New research from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study shows that exposure to outdoor air pollution during the first year of life increases the risk of developing allergies to food, mould, pets and pests.

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Seasonal allergies: tips and remedies
Source:
Medical News Today

For many people, the emergence of marauding ticks at this time of year is the least of their worries. The real struggle for these people is with seasonal allergies, also referred to as hay fever or allergic rhinitis.

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New study recommends early introduction of peanuts to prevent allergies
Source:
Medical Xpress

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are a dietary staple for many children. But for others, peanut products can be life-threatening and are strictly taboo. A new study released at a meeting of the American Academy and Association of Allergies and Immunology (AAAAI) and published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that peanut allergies can be prevented through early exposure.

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Enzyme in cosmetic products can act as allergen via the skin
Source:
Medical News Today

Papain is an important industrial protein-degrading enzyme that is used, for example, in the food and cosmetic industries. When humans or animals come in contact with papain, strong allergic reactions of the skin can be the result, as scientists from the Messerli Research Institute of the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, the Medical University of Vienna, and the University of Vienna have found out. Their study was published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

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Blood test predicts severity of peanut and seafood allergies
Source:
Medical News Today

A new blood test promises to predict which people will have severe allergic reactions to foods according to a new study led by Mount Sinai researchers and published online in the The Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

To detect food allergies, physicians typically use skin prick tests or blood tests that measure levels of allergen-specific IgE (sIgE), a protein made by the immune system. However, these tests cannot predict the severity of allergic reactions. Oral food challenges, in which specific allergens are given to patients to ingest under physician supervision to test for signs or symptoms of an allergic reaction, remain the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy even though the tests themselves can trigger severe reactions.

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Spring allergies coming into bloom
Source:
Medical Xpress

With winter loosening its icy grip on most of the United States, it’s time to think about spring allergies, a doctor says. Allergies to spring pollens cause sneezing, stuffy and runny nose, and watery eyes. Other symptoms include itchy nose, mouth, throat, eyes and ears, said Dr. Luz Fonacier, head of allergy and training at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y.

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Food allergies can be transmitted from blood products to children in rare cases
Source:
Medical News Today

In rare cases, children can develop anaphylactic allergies to previously tolerated foods after receiving blood products via transfusion, report the authors of a case study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

“People shouldn’t be overly concerned about passive transfer of allergy from blood products, says Dr. Julia Upton, The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Toronto, Ontario. “This condition has an excellent prognosis and typically resolves within a few months.”

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The significance of cleanliness and personal hygiene in the pathogenesis of allergies
Source:
Medical Xpress

A new study carried out by LMU researchers has found no evidence for the notion that an overemphasis on personal and household hygiene stimulates the development of childhood allergies and asthma. The finding is based on data obtained from 400 families, which was compiled and analyzed by the research group led by Professor Erika von Mutius, Head of the Outpatient Department of Asthma Allergies at Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital, Munich. The results appear in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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The American Thoracic Society suggests that FeNO may be used to determine the likelihood of steroid responsiveness of chronic respiratory symptoms possibly due to airway inflammation.

FeNO testing can be performed for your patients by Shoban Davé, MD at the Flatiron Allergy & Asthma Center in Louisville.

 

Tiotropium for Asthma — Promise and Caution
Source:
NEJM

Anticholinergic agents have been available for the treatment of airways obstruction for many decades. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), many practitioners believe that these drugs have become the bronchodilator of choice. For patients with asthma, anticholinergic agents are less popular, probably because of their slower onset of action as a reliever medication and their generally inferior effect on lung function and symptoms, as compared with inhaled beta-agonists.

Not surprisingly, long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) in combination with inhaled glucocorticoids have become standard treatment for patients with asthma that is poorly controlled while receiving inhaled glucocorticoids alone.

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Acute bacterial sinusitis in children
Source:
NEJM

Acute bacterial sinusitis is diagnosed in children with persistent rhinorrhea and cough, severe symptoms, or worsening of symptoms after initial improvement. Antibiotic therapy is recommended, and amoxicillin–clavulanate is generally the first-line treatment.

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Promising new treatment for kids with egg allergy
Source:
abc News

If you’re allergic to eggs, a doctor has probably told you to avoid the protein. But researchers have now found that eating small amounts of egg for several months may lower the allergic reaction.

The multi-center study, published in the ;New England Journal of Medicine ;, found that giving children with egg allergies a small amount of egg-white powder for 10 months reduced or eliminated their allergy after the study period.

About 4 percent of children in the U.S. ;experience food allergies, according to the research, and egg allergy is one of the most common. Many children outgrow the allergy after age 5, but for some, the sensitivity can ;continue ;into adulthood. Food allergy reactions can range from a mild rash to death.

“The children were treated and then taken off treatment, the first large study to do so. Almost a third of those treated were able to come off treatment and now eat eggs in their diet,” Dr. Wesley Burks, the lead author of the study and chairman of pediatrics at UNC, told ABCNews.com.

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Allergy Risk May Be Increased By Triclosan in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products
Source:
Medical News Today

Triclosan – an antibacterial chemical found in toothpaste and other products – can contribute to an increased risk of allergy development in children. This comes from the Norwegian Environment and Childhood Asthma Study, in which the Norwegian Institute of Public Health is involved. Similar results are reported in the USA.

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Oral immunotherapy for treatment of egg allergy in children
Source: NEJM

For egg allergy, dietary avoidance is the only currently approved treatment. We evaluated oral immunotherapy using egg-white powder for the treatment of children with egg allergy.

These results show that oral immunotherapy can desensitize a high proportion of children with egg allergy and induce sustained unresponsiveness in a clinically significant subset.

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Asthma treatment with omalizumab (xolair®), new data shows benefits
Source:Medical News Today

New data analyses presented at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress in Vienna show that long-term treatment with omalizumab (Xolair®) significantly improves a range of outcomes for people with severe persistent allergicasthma, a chronic condition affecting an estimated 14,315 people in the UK4. Asthma can be a devastating condition, causing an average of three deaths in the UK every day, 90% of which are preventable with optimal management5. ;

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Effect of inhaled glucocorticoids in childhood on adult height
Source:NEJM

The use of inhaled glucocorticoids for persistent asthma causes a temporary reduction in growth velocity in prepubertal children. The resulting decrease in attained height 1 to 4 years after the initiation of inhaled glucocorticoids is thought not to decrease attained adult height.
The initial decrease in attained height associated with the use of inhaled glucocorticoids in prepubertal children persisted as a reduction in adult height, although the decrease was not progressive or cumulative.

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Tiotropium in asthma poorly controlled with standard combination therapy
Source: NEJM

Some patients with asthma have frequent exacerbations and persistent airflow obstruction despite treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids and long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs).

In patients with poorly controlled asthma despite the use of inhaled glucocorticoids and LABAs, the addition of tiotropium significantly increased the time to the first severe exacerbation and provided modest sustained bronchodilation. ;

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Corticosteroids not effective for treating acute sinusitis, study suggests
Source: Science Daily

Corticosteroids, frequently prescribed to alleviate acute sinusitis, show no clinical benefit in treating the condition, according to a randomized controlled trial published in ;CMAJ ;

The common cold is the main cause of acute sinusitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the nasal cavities, blocked nasal passages and sometimes headaches and facial pain. Allergies and bacteria can also cause the condition, which is uncomfortable and difficult to treat. Antibiotics are a common treatment, despite the fact that the cause is often viral and will not respond to antibiotics. Corticosteroids are increasingly being used to alleviate symptoms, although the evidence for efficacy is inconclusive.

“We found no clinically relevant effect of systemic corticosteroid monotherapy among patients with clinically diagnosed, uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis,” writes Dr. Roderick Venekamp, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands, with coauthors.

“There is no rationale for the use of corticosteroids in the broad population of patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis,” write the authors. “Future studies should focus on identifying subgroups of patients who may benefit from intranasal or systemic corticosteroid treatment.”

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